Guide to The Most Impressive Waterfalls in Thailand

1 Jun 2022

Thailand has mystical temples, majestic palaces, luxurious golf courses, gorgeous beaches and coral reefs, mouthwatering food, kickboxing, massage, and (last but not least) impressive waterfalls! You have to add these natural beauties to your bucket list. Some are easy to see, while others are a challenge, and all of them are worth it!

 

Erawan Falls

Kanchanaburi Province, Thailand (approximately 3 hours drive west of Bangkok)

Erawan Falls, located in Erawan National Park, is one of the most beautiful waterfalls in Thailand. It's 100% worth spending an entire day exploring. It consists of 7 tiers (waterfalls) and emerald green ponds accessed by hiking trails and footbridges. Many of the plunge pools contain schools of fish. Such a dynamic waterfalling adventure (including the street market at the trailhead) means that there's something for everyone to enjoy.

Erawan waterfalls trail has narrow, slippery areas and dramatic slopes. Seeing the full falls requires a 1.5-kilometre hike, which takes around an hour and a half to complete one way. Some of the upper waterfalls provide the ideal environment for reflection and contemplation (meditation) since many people bail out on completing the trek to the top.

To experience Erawan Falls in all its glory, visit when the water flows the most between September and December. Also, we recommend staying overnight in Kanchanaburi and visiting Erawan Falls as part of a more extensive Kanchanaburi itinerary. There are other lovely tourist attractions in the city to experience.

 

Haew Narok Waterfall

Nakhon Ratchasima Province, Thailand

This 3-tiered cascade is Khao Yai National Park's highest and most magnificent waterfall. These three-tiered falls crash upon the rocks, generating a deafening boom and spraying water high into the air. When water droplets hit the sun, rainbows form.

The waterfall's parking lot is only 1 km away. You can admire your surroundings along the nature trail from there to the waterfall.  

When reaching the waterfall, a narrow, steep stairway descends 50 meters to a viewpoint where you can observe the waterfall's grandeur and splendour from a distance.

The rainy season brings lots of water. In the dry season, there's no water, just barren cliffs.

 

Haew Suwat Waterfall

Nakhon Ratchasima

Khao Yai National Park's Haew Suwat Waterfall is a popular attraction. It was used in the Leonardo Di Caprio film The Beach. It drops 20 meters from a cliff and features a basin and stream. If you love water, it's the perfect waterfall. People love to cool down in the enormous, deep pool and sit on one of the many smooth stones surrounding it. Aside from that, a giant viewing platform lets you see the falls from above.

 

Khlong Chak Waterfall

Krabi

Khlong Chak waterfall is located on Koh Lanta, Krabi Province, on Thailand's Andaman coast. Koh Lanta is the largest island in Mu Ko Lanta National Park and has many caves. Hikers must follow a scenic trek past quaint houses and farms into the bush to reach the waterfall. After 20-30 minutes, Khlong Chak's clear waters appear. The scenery and the hike through the rainforest make it unique.

This waterfall dries up in the dry season; therefore, visit during the rainy season.

 

Khlong Lan Waterfall

Kamphaeng Phet Province, Thailand

Five mountain creeks join and plunge over a limestone cliff into a big lake before falling 100 meters into a jagged chasm. That is Khlong Lan Waterfall. It's an easily accessible Khlong Lan National Park feature, part of Sukhothai's UNESCO World Heritage designation in Kamphaeng Phet Province, lower north Thailand.

The Thai region of Kamphaeng Phet is off the usual path, being north of Bangkok and south of Chiang Mai. But this makes the waterfall quite serene as there are few people. So instead, you'll likely share the falls with numerous orange-robed monks.

In addition to visiting the waterfall, you should also see the Kamphaeng Phet Historical Park, which includes authentic, evocative ruins.

 

Koh Luang Waterfall

Lamphun

In northern Thailand's Mae Ping National Park is Koh Luang falls, a three-and-a-half-hour journey from Chiang Mai.

It's a 7-level limestone waterfall caused by Mae Ko River tumbling over a 20-km-high rock, ending in a gorgeous emerald green pool popular for swimming. In addition, there are limestone caves nearby with unique stalactite and stalagmite formations.

 

Mae Klang Waterfall

Chiang Mai Province, Thailand

Mae Klang waterfall is a 100-metre tall waterfall.

Mae Klang Waterfall lies near Doi Inthanon National Park's eastern entrance gate. Inside the entrance gate are eateries, vendors, and restrooms.

The 450-meter hike to the falls is uphill. The 30-meter waterfall tumbles over a massive wall before continuing downriver in rapids and cascades.

There are attractive places and picnic seats along the riverfront below, although swimming is prohibited. At the falls, stone steps lead to a viewing pavilion, and a single-track dirt trail continues upriver and into the park, passing enormous riverside rocks where hikers can relax and enjoy the view.

 

Mae Surin Waterfall

Mae Hong Son

This waterfall is the centrepiece of Namtok Mae Surin National Park. It is a single-tier cascade that falls 100 meters from a cliff's edge. Furthermore, the location is the country's most mountainous area, so the views are stunning.

The park's forests contain dry dipterocarp on lower slopes, bamboo in logged areas, teak, deciduous and montane evergreen at medium elevations, and pine on the summits. Some park valleys and slopes have rice terraces. Most residents are Karenni (Red Karen) and Hmong (hilltribe).

The waterfall is positioned on the opposite side of a ravine from the headquarters parking lot, so you can even take a photo of the waterfall right from your vehicle. A steep trail runs down to the falls to get nearer—factor two to three hours for the round trip.

 

Mae Ya Waterfall

Chiang Mai Province, Thailand

Mae Ya Waterfall is in Chiang Mai's Doi Inthanon National Park. It's one of Thailand's most spectacular waterfalls and the largest in the park. Don't miss it! This 260-meter-tall, 100-meter-wide falls rush violently yet beautifully down a stratified granite face and are surrounded by woodland.

You can take photos and swim in the beautiful waters downstream.

 

Pha Chareon Waterfall

Tak Province, Thailand

This stunning 97-tiered waterfall is in Namtok Pha Chareon National Park. Its water flows across limestone tiers, offering the picturesque view of a fantasy stairway. And you won't have to work too hard to see it either. A short trail through a campground and picnic area brings you to it.

 

Pha Dok Siew Waterfall

Chiang Mai

Pha Dok Siew Waterfall is another of Doi Inthanon National Park's treasures. It's at the end of a fun jungle journey halfway up the mountain (Thailand's highest peak). Due to its remote location, most visitors join a tour group with a guide to help them get there by the most accessible and most exciting route possible, typically seeing hill tribal settlements along the way.

 

Siriphum Waterfall

Chiang Mai Province, Thailand

Siriphum Waterfall is a twin waterfall that was once called Lao Lee, after a local Mong village leader. It's another Doi Inthanon waterfall. Not only is it impressive, but if you visit at the right time, the waterfall is surrounded by purple blossoms and blessed with crystal blue skies.

The 600-meter Siriphum Waterfall Nature Trail is also excellent. Many trees and flowers shade the trail to the waterfall. Over 50 fern species, including tree fern, black stem fern, and Rasmijot fern, can be spotted.

 

Thi Lo Su Waterfall

Tak Province, Thailand

Thi Lor Su is one of Thailand's largest waterfalls, located in the Umphang Wildlife Sanctuary, a UNESCO world heritage site in central Thailand. Before 30 years ago, only hill tribal villagers knew about the waterfall. This secluded location is hard to reach but worth it.

Getting to and from the falls is an adventure in itself. Thi Lor Su Waterfall is 28 kilometres from Umphang. Umphang is connected via a dirt track, which becomes inaccessible during the wet season. Umphang town's sole other option is forest trekking. You can also raft and hike from Umphang's Mae Klong River.

The most adventurous option: Thi Lor Su waterfall may be seen on a 3-day, 3-night journey from Umphang. Tours incorporate jungle trekking, river rafting, and living in a remote Karen Village.

Near Thi Lor Su waterfall are a few modest facilities. There are restrooms, showers, campsites and a small shop. A concrete jungle walkway connects the campground and waterfall (15 minutes).

To get to the waterfalls, you'll have to walk 40 minutes along an artificial trail. Once there, its three layers of flowing water nestled in the tranquillity of nature will ease your mind. You can bathe in the pools below if you need to cool off. In addition, the trail to the top offers fantastic views. To reach the summit, you must traverse rivers and climb minor waterfalls while getting wet.

You can hear the falls from one kilometre away during the rainy season, and water flows year-round.

 

Wachirathan Waterfall

Chiang Mai Province, Thailand

Wachirathan Falls are in Thailand's Chom Thong district, also in Doi Inthanon National Park. It's the second-largest waterfall on the way to the peak and one of the most impressive. However, the muddy approach to the falls demands suitable footwear.  

Mist from the falls produces a lovely sight in the valley, but protective cases are needed for devices.

During the wet season, the multi-levelled waterfall provides ample water for swimming.

Explore the park after visiting the falls. If you have time, stay overnight. Basic bungalows and private campsites are available for overnight stays. In addition, you can hire camping equipment and sleeping bags. The park contains showers, toilets, and essential Thai restaurants.